Post Matal Care

Post Matal Care
Breastfeeding mothers who have concerns about meeting their's and their newborn's nutritional needs while lactating are encouraged to consult a pediatrician or gynecologist for assistance.
Babies get all their nutritional needs from milk for the first six mon .ths following their birth. Although some mothers prefer formula for a number of reasons, including the inability to produce sufficient breast milk, various health organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recommends breastfeeding until two years of age.
Breast milk is considered the best for infants as it contains all the nutrients that babies need to thrive. It contains colostrum, a sticky yellowish substance that offers immunity against infections. Many studies also suggest that breastfeeding offers better health for both the mom and the baby in later life, even if the latter is born preterm. It can also be part of "kangaroo care", which emphasizes skin-to-skin contact for premature babies to increase their chances of survival. Babies who are breastfed also have 50% reduced risk of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
Breastfeeding, however, can be tedious, exhausting, and draining for moms, who may also be concerned about how their food affects breast milk supply and whether there’s a special diet to eat to produce more milk. These concerns are covered during a breastfeeding nutrition checkup.